Faber-Castell Inks Test

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I sourced these Faber-Castell samples from Rachel and Brian at Goulet Pens and they’re quite lovely.

Carbon Black – a proper rich black ink. Mixes with water readily with a hint of purple at the swatch edge. A strong gold when subjected to bleach. A solid black when used for writing.

Stone Grey – a lovely even grey ink. Mixes with water readily with a hint of purple at the swatch edge. A bright gold when subjected to bleach. An even mid grey when used for writing.

Midnight Blue – a dark rich blue. Mixes with water readily with a hint of purple and cyan at the swatch edges. A dull white gold when subjected to bleach. An even dark blue used for writing.

Cobalt Blue – a deep rich blue. Mixes with water washing out purple with plenty of cyan at the swatch edges. A dull white gold when subjected to bleach. A kind of reddy purplish blue when used for writing. Love it!

Garnet Red – a deep rich red. Mixes with water easily with grading out at the edges. A feint white when subjected to bleach. A sheen is visible in the deeper areas. A deep red when used for writing.

Hazelnut Brown – a deep rich brown. Mixes with water easily with grading out at the edges. A feint red when subjected to bleach. A sheen is visible in the deeper areas. A deep brown when used for writing. Love it!

Moss Green – a deep forest green. Mixes with water easily with olives and cyans leaching out at the edges. A feint yellow cyan when subjected to bleach. A very dark green when used for writing.

What a great eclectic group of inks! Each one a character. I will be doing a test piece with these.

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4 thoughts on “Faber-Castell Inks Test

  1. Hi Nick, been catching up on your reviews. I look forward to seeing your test piece with these. I’m curious what nib you use. I’ve used bleach with dip pen and it deteriorated the nib. Maybe you have some advice?

    • Morning Jessica. I use a flex nib called a Zebra G. Of all the flex nibs I’ve tried, this appears to work best for me. Long term exposure to bleach will cause rusting but provided the nib is thoroughly washed after being dipped in bleach, it should last a long time. If you don’t wash the nib immediately after use, the bleach will slowly but surely start to corrode the metal. I always have 2 of 3 pots of water nearby and just get in the habit of washing my pens and brushes immediately after use, whether ink or bleach and then dry them with some kitchen towel. Prolongs their life and saves money! Nx

  2. Pingback: Top 12 Fountain Pen Inks 2016 and Project Review | FOUNTAIN PEN INKS & BLEACH

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